Conservatory & Sunroom Planning Permission

Conservatory / Sun Room - Planning Permission

The whole area of planning permission can be a difficult subject to navigate especially when you really just want to progress and begin your conservatory / sunroom extension. Maybe you wish to put your property on the market and are unsure about the planning permission status of your own property’s conservatory / sunroom. In Ireland, planning regulations are strict and enforceable so it’s important to have as much knowledge prior to getting any work done to prevent any costly repercussions down the line. Those repercussions can be in the form of fines, having to knock down /remove a property (or part of) and even court prosecution! In this guide, we explain what you need to know about conservatory and sunroom extension planning permission in Ireland.

Conservatory & Sunroom Planning Permission – The Guidelines

Firstly, it’s important to make the distinction between the two terms: conservatories and sunrooms. A sunroom is a solid structure, similar to a “regular” extension with a solid roof but with more windows. A conservatory differs because it is almost entirely made out of glass with a glass or clear plastic roof. Sometimes, the phrases are used interchangeably but it’s good to be informed with the definitive difference!

Planning Permission is NOT Required for Conservatories / Sunrooms When:

  • The floor area does not exceed 40 Square Metres (430 Square Feet)
  • It will be located to the rear of the property and at ground level (will not be higher than the existing property)
  • The conservatory or sunroom won’t have glass facing a neighbouring property within one metre of the boundary.
  • The finished conservatory or sunroom will have at least 25 Square Metres of garden space remaining.

Planning Permission is Required for Conservatories / Sunrooms When:

  • A property is owned on a leasehold basis, whereby the gardens / communal areas are held by a management company. In that instance, you’d first need to seek permission to even apply for the planning permission from the management company.
  • A clause exists on a property deeds restricting any extensions (of any size). This is quite rare but important to check if you, for example bought your property from a housing authority.

For extra assistance on how to initiate planning permission or to see if you actually need it in the first place, it’s advisable to get in touch with a design / planning consultant. The Citizens Advice Bureau also provides helpful and easy to understand advice for advancing the matter.