How to Host a Property Viewing

Staging a house or property viewing

 

Hosting your own viewing is easy to do but we have some advice on how to make it go really well for you and delight your prospective buyers:

  • Decide in advance on the order you’ll show the rooms of your property and think about positive features you may want to highlight.
  • Begin and finish the viewing in the most impressive room of your home; the one that will make most impact. This will generate a good first and last impression.
  • Buyers might want some space during the viewing so explain a room and then maybe take a step out until they rejoin you.
  • Keep things friendly and stick to the facts. Just show them everything and at the end, make sure to give them your Auctioneera property ID to facilitate them in making a bid if they so wish.

Dos and Don’ts of Property Staging

Do:

  1. Be polite, friendly and welcoming to those viewing.
  2. Begin the viewing with a general house overview and background – room layout, some house history, how long you’ve lived there and why you’re selling.
  3. Highlight something that you love about each room as you go through the tour – for example a certain room gets lots of natural light or the bath is particularly comfortable.
  4. Step back and give your potential buyers some space. Be on hand to answer any questions.
  5. Don’t forget to show unique elements of your property; for example hidden features, a sizeable attic or a large garage.
  6. Tell your potential buyers to get in touch if they have any questions they want to follow up on.
  7. Give them your Auctioneera property ID and advise them that they can make a bid there as well as monitor the progress of the bidding in real time.

Don’t:

  1. Bombard your visitors with information; they will already have seen the key points in the property listing.
  2. Try to cover something up. If you’re asked a “difficult” question, answer it as honestly as you can. Don’t try to intentionally mislead them.
  3. Talk about family memories. Keep it neutral as a way of de-personalising the property for their benefit.